1980s Bennett 10-Speed Restoration

This is the Bennett as it is now, it is not quite finished as you can see, but it will be some time till I can get the grips I want for it so I wanted to post some progress pics of it now.

As I posted previously, I had some trouble with fitting the rear mudguard and ended up purchasing these P clips …I couldn’t get them locally so I ordered them from Cheeky Transport in Newtown for $12, which boosted the cost of the mudguard somewhat, but they worked well. Here’s a shot of the rear derailleur and you can see how the mudguard and rack fittings work, it is all quite neat. You can also see parts which still require touch up paint ….

The rack does not sit straight and I am not sure if I can get it to, it just seems to be a slightly wrong fit for the bike, although it works quite well in this position.I had some help with the final stages of this restoration. Wayne, an old friend and reader of this blog, was able to adjust the gears for me, fit part of the rack and rear mudguard and adjust the brakes. His place is much better set up to work on a bike than mine is …¬†Also, my beloved helped out with removing and replacing the handlebars, I had struggled with them for about 30 minutes before he took over and it only took him a short time to get the handlebars off whereas I do not think I could have managed to get them off myself.

Wayne also gave me some metal polish which I used to give a final polish to the alloy components and it gave them a gorgeous chrome-like shine, this was after I had polished them with wet and dry paper, then Brasso… see the headbadge, front brake calipers and seat post …The bike rides very nicely. I was worried it may be too small and once I take it on a longer ride this may prove to be the case but for the relatively short rides I have done on it, it is OK, though the seat feels as if it would be more comfortable slightly further back. On reflection, maybe the moustache bars I had originally intended for it would have solved this problem. I will also consider a leather saddle for it but I want to be sure I will keep it before making this purchase. This is me riding it (I look more cramped than I felt)…I have been able to keep the original brake levers with the handlebars I am using, though this is the only position they work in. This does, however, enable me to use grips, instead of tape, with them and I am intending to get some grips in cork. Also, the original bell goes well with the new colour scheme …

I will post final pictures once I have finished it, it has been a much longer project than I anticipated, but now it is nearly finished, I am happy with how it has turned out and it is a very nice, sporty ride. The pie plate still looks quite terrible as the rust will not come off it but I feel that with a friction shifter it is a safety feature I need. For earlier posts about this bike restoration project, see here.

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4 Responses to 1980s Bennett 10-Speed Restoration

  1. anniebikes says:

    The handlebars look great. I like downtube shifting, especially after using it on my Miyata. Because the shifting is not on the bars, it’s much easier to change handllebars as you found out plus it leaves space for a rack or basket up front. It certainly is a cleaner look.

    The gumwall tires fit nicely Very sweet.

    I’m thinking about the rack.They cant at an odd angle, aesthetically and for function. I do like the rounded style to them though. We have an old rack here that’s similar. I know you don’t want to necessarily buy a new one. Since the p-clamps worked for the fenders, could something similar work on the rack? Could you cut the two arms shorter and use the p-clamps to attach it to the frame?

  2. Vicki says:

    Thanks, Annie, I only got these bars as they were such a bargain and I felt would suit the bike, I also like the look of them, but moustaches would have given me more reach.
    With the rack, if I can straighten the tubes that go toward the saddle it would solve the problem, I may give that a go. Otherwise, lengthening the tubes that go toward the dropouts would work. I may be able to get an insert to go there.

  3. Phil J says:

    Those bars are just what I’m looking for! What are they?

    • Vicki says:

      I don’t know what they are called as they were sitting unpackaged in my local bike shop and he sold them to me for $10, I didn’t think to ask for their name.

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